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Allergy Treatment North Little Rock AR

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Allergy Treatment. You will find informative articles about Allergy Treatment, including "Health and Allergies, Nothing to Sneeze At". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in North Little Rock, AR that can help answer your questions about Allergy Treatment.

Frederick James Kittler, MD
(501) 758-9696
2504 McCain Blvd Ste 118
North Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1957
Hospital
Hospital: St Vincent Infirmary-Med Ctr, Little Rock, Ar; Arkansas Childrens Hosp, Little Rock, Ar
Group Practice: Arkansas Allergy Clinic

Data Provided By:
Ricki M Helm, PHD FAAAAI
(501) 364-3572
Slot 512-20B 1120 Marshall Street
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Joseph Gary Wheeler, MD
(501) 320-1416
800 Marshall St
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med, Houston Tx 77030
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Stacie Mc Han Jones, MD
(501) 320-1060
1120 Marshall Street Slot 512-13
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
Jack J Blessing, MD
(501) 364-1100
800 Marshall St
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Rijksuniversiteit Te Leiden, Fac Der Geneeskunde, Leiden, Netherlands
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
Terry Odell Harville, MD
(501) 614-2000
800 Marshall St
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Allergy
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Fl Coll Of Med, Gainesville Fl 32610
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Rosalind Abernathy
(501) 364-1100
800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock, AR
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided By:
Tamara T Perry, MD
(501) 364-1060
1120 Marshall Street Slot 512-13
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Amy M Scurlock, MD
(501) 364-1060
Slot 512-13 1120 Marshall Street
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 1998

Data Provided By:
Arvil Wesley Burks Jr, MD
(501) 614-2000
1120 Marshall St
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
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Health and Allergies, Nothing to Sneeze At

Allergies: Nothing to Sneeze At

By Robin Hoogshagen, RPH
Manager of Wal-Mart's Home Office Pharmacy

Spring is in the air - along with pollen, mold, and dust mites.
If you're already sneezing and reaching for a tissue, you could be one of more than 50 million Americans who suffer from allergic diseases, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Allergies are the sixth leading cause of chronic disease in the United States, costing the healthcare system $18 billion annually.

What is an allergy? Everyone comes into contact with foreign substances, such as pollen. When a person has an allergic response, his or her body reacts to the foreign substance as if it were harmful. The body then releases potent chemicals, such as histamine, which cause the symptoms we usually associate with allergies - sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, wheezing, itching and hives.

Some of the most common allergens are pollen, mold, dust mites, and animal dander. In addition, some people suffer from food allergies, or have extreme reactions to insect stings, and even to some medications.

Diagnosing and treating allergies

If you think you might have allergies, contact your doctor. He or she can administer an allergy skin test, or scratch test, where a sample of different allergens are tested on your skin for a reaction.

To treat allergies, doctors today often use a triple approach. This means working with patients to:

  • Avoid allergens as much as possible
  • Submit to a series of allergen shots, or
  • Find the right combination of prescription or over-the-counter medications to ease symptoms.

Avoiding allergens can be as simple as remaining indoors during the early part of the day when pollen levels outside tend to be higher. People with sensitivities to dust mites can eliminate wall-to-wall carpet in their home and instead use washable throw rugs over an easily cleaned floor surface.

Someone allergic to pets might have to forgo pet ownership altogether. Barring that, you can try grooming your pet frequently and using a vacuum cleaner with a high-efficiency filter. Keeping pets out of your bedroom - and especially off your bed - is another tactic that might help ease allergy symptoms.

Like making changes in your lifestyle and home, allergy shots require a certain level of commitment for the allergy sufferer. A doctor injects extracts of the allergen into the skin over a period of weeks, months, and sometimes years to help the immune system create antibodies.

Easing the symptoms

Need more immediate relief? There are several over-the-counter and prescription medications that might help.
Antihistamines are used to treat sneezing, watery and irritated eyes, and runny noses. Diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine, commonly known as Benadryl and ChlorTrimeton, are two familiar antihistamines. However, common side effects include drowsiness, so use caution when taking these medications.
Newer antihistamines ha...

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